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Upper Academics

In the Upper School, students take courses in Mathematics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, English Literature, American History, World History, and Anthropology. Students are required to take at least one year of Physical Education, but have the option of taking multiple years as an elective course.

For World Languages, students can choose from courses in Hawaiian, Spanish, and Japanese language.

The Arts Program at IPA offers courses in visual arts, theater, band, and orchestra.

For Design Technology courses, students can choose from Computer Science Principles, Cybersecurity, Engineering, Photography & Film Making, Graphic Design, Jewelry Making, and Publishing.

For more information about specific course offerings and descriptions, see below. You can also download the Grade 9–12 Course Guide.

Upper Curriculum

Accordion Content

ELR 100 English 9
In “Exploration of Identity, Healing, and Transformation through Diverse Cultural Narratives,” 9th graders embark on a literary journey, intertwining the school’s core values of Human Kindness, Generosity, Excellence, Ingenuity, and Growth-Mindset with a diverse selection of novels. This course goes beyond traditional text studies, connecting
literature like “Patron Saints of Nothing,” “Children of Blood and Bone,” “Feed,” “The Healers,” and “The Tempest” to real-life experiences and challenges. Through these stories, students explore identity, healing, and transformation, relating them to our core values. Active engagement with the material through discussions and assessments promotes academic and personal growth. By year’s end, students will become not only critical thinkers and storytellers but also empathetic individuals ready to make a positive impact in their communities, understanding the transformative power of stories.

ELR 200 English 10
English 10 allows sophomores to build on the fundamental skills developed in English 9, while pushing them to continue to refine their academic skills as writers, editors and critical thinkers. In this course, sophomores will be encouraged to think dynamically by considering how novels can interrogate similar ideas via different lenses or
perspectives in order to help students solidify their own personal worldview. To accomplish this, students will be asked to explore and challenge a guiding theme that will remain constant throughout the entire year. Their understanding of this guiding theme will become richer and more nuanced as they move through each text. Ultimately, this course will not only allow students to think deeper about authorial intention, writer’s craft, and character mindset but also allow students to think about themselves and their relationship to the world around them.

ELR 230 Publication 1
A yearbook is more than just a book of pictures; it contains a year of memories that cannot be replaced. Therefore, it takes a hardworking, fun yearbook staff to capture these special moments for the school. In this elective course, students will focus on the creation and publication of a high-quality, memorable yearbook for the school. This course
will provide training for students in journalism, graphic design, and the use of necessary equipment and computer applications. Students will learn foundational photography skills to take good, memorable photos for the yearbook. Participation in this course will prepare students for future work in publishing, advertising, marketing, and journalism. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for Publication 2. Students are eligible to take this course starting from Grade 10.

ELR 300 English 11
21st Century Women Writers of Color – Students will examine multicultural perspectives of women authors using short stories, poetry, and Hawaiian literature. By examining satire, mythology, and storytelling, students will discover a perspective often silenced or marginalized by our patriarchal society and promote awareness of a more complex world. We will begin with an analysis of a definition of feminine space, consider how it has been suppressed, and move on to discussing how the female voice has been portrayed throughout history. Finally, we will consider how these voices have either evolved or devolved through current texts and media.

The Rhetoric of Reality: Analyzing 21st Century Nonfiction Texts – While reading the same nonfiction works as AP Language, students will explore the complex context into how these 21st century texts change as the way we look at poverty and our justice system. Students will learn how to look at the world through a critical lens by writing rhetorical analyses on various non-fiction pieces. By analyzing these writings, students will interrogate the course texts to critique a romanticized view of poverty and justice.

ELR _____ Creative Writing Theory
This dynamic course delves into the exploration of archetypes and the hero’s journey, pivotal elements in storytelling across various mediums. Through a focus on classic and contemporary narratives found in literature and film, students will uncover the universal themes that resonate across human experiences. Central to the course is the emphasis on creative writing, where students will learn the structure of the narratives, characters, and journeys inspired by the archetypal patterns introduced in class. This creative process is deeply connected to our school’s core values, particularly highlighting the power of human kindness and generosity of spirit by encouraging students to create stories that reflect empathy, resilience, and the transformative power of kindness. The course fosters a commitment to excellence through the pursuit of well-crafted, thoughtful storytelling, pushing students to reach new heights in their writing skills. Ingenuity is at the heart of their creative endeavors, as students are challenged to weave contemporary issues and personal insights into their archetypal narratives, bringing fresh perspectives to age-old themes. Moreover, the course is designed to cultivate a growth mindset, encouraging students to view the creative writing process as a journey of continuous learning and self-discovery. By integrating these core values, the course aims not only to enhance students’ understanding and appreciation of literary and cinematic works but also to empower them to find their unique voices and contribute meaningfully to the tapestry of human stories.

ELR 315 Creative Writing 1
This elective course focuses on creating, building, and refining writing skills within the broad parameters of creative writing. Following a brief introduction to general writing strategies and techniques, the first semester of the course will highlight the fundamentals of creative writing through the creation of a long-form project. The second semester will shift gears to the more nuanced aspects of writing – exploring a number of different genres and styles as selected by the class – while continuing to build on the skills and strategies developed in the first semester. Ultimately, in both semesters, students will be encouraged to take charge of their own writing projects so as to create a dynamic and varied portfolio of writing by the end of the course. Students are eligible to take this course starting from Grade 10. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for Creative Writing 2.

ELR 330 Publication 2
In this elective course, students will focus on the creation and publication of a high-quality, memorable yearbook for the school. Students will continue to build on their layout and design skills, as well as improve their photography skills. Students will learn basic journalistic writing and interviewing skills. This course will prepare students to hold leadership roles for the yearbook staff by providing support to Publication 1 students. Participation in this course will prepare students for future work in publishing, advertising, marketing, and journalism. Students must have successfully completed Publication 1 to take this course. Students are eligible to take this course from Grade 10.

ELR 350 AP English Language and Composition
The AP English Language and Composition course focuses on the development and revision of evidence-based analytic and argumentative writing, the rhetorical analysis of nonfiction texts, and the decisions writers make as they compose and revise. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Additionally, they read and analyze rhetorical elements and their effects in nonfiction texts including images as forms of text— from a range of disciplines and historical periods. Students are eligible to take this course starting from Grade 11.

ELR 400 English 12
Visual Text: The Language of Film, Comics, and Images – A Rhetoric, Argument, and Composition seminar analyzing the language of images. This seminar will study visual texts to explore the unique ways stories are told through images. Following a detailed background study of film and comic techniques – such as framing, action, scene construction, and pace – we will engage with a number of texts from different genres, discussing the power of image as a storytelling tool. Towards the end of the seminar, students will be encouraged to pursue their own passions in regard to visual texts: creating new works, analyzing works of their choosing, or proposing their own projects. Ultimately, this seminar will encourage students to engage with an ever expanding creative and academic field. With increasing global connectivity, image is becoming a much more prevalent and important communication tool, influencing academic and social circles well beyond any one genre.

Apocalypse Fiction – A literature seminar exploring the tropes and themes of Apocalypse Literature in context. This seminar will briefly explore how the discovery and implementation of the atomic bomb  profoundly affected history, society, and artistic expression. The seminar will begin with a thorough investigation into the development of atomic weaponry throughout the Cold War, exploring the ways global politics shifted within a world of mutually-assured-destruction. After the historical framework we will transition to exploring apocalypse fiction, from zombies to natural disasters, discovering how our modern conception of the potential end of humanity is, ultimately, born out of atomic fears. The seminar will culminate with each student creating their own personal project, anything from an historical interpretation to a short film or story, that considers some aspect of our discussion. This seminar will prepare students for multi-disciplinary college courses and for advanced academic interpretation.

ELR 410 Journalism
In this elective course, students will learn journalism skills in news writing, editing, and other elements of analytical writing. They will be in charge of providing content for the school’s newsletter. These are skills that are applicable in any writing area, and can be translated into better writing confidence for everything from academic papers and college essays to short stories. By the end of the year students should be well versed in pre-writing, writing, and revising techniques, critical thinking strategies, rhetorical awareness, and information literacy. Students are eligible to take this course beginning in Grade 10.

ELR 415 Creative Writing 2
This is a student-driven elective writing course where participants build off of prior learning and take a leadership role in designing, implementing, and assessing their own projects, as well as collaborating to build a culture of creation and revision. As an open-lab, individual students drive all their own work in this course. After proposing a project, each individual student will lay out their own process, seek feedback, make revisions, and then share and celebrate a completed project with the class. This will prepare students for a future in writing across all genres and all fields, as the fundamentals of writing and revising translate universally, and students can take charge of this learning as they develop their own voice, interest, and expertise in the process of writing. Students must have successfully completed Creative Writing 1 to take this course. Students are eligible to take this course beginning in Grade 11.

ELR 430 Publication 3
In this elective course, students will focus on the creation and publication of a high-quality, memorable yearbook for the school. Students in this course will hold leadership positions on the yearbook staff. Students will help with the workflow of the yearbook staff and the editing of the yearbook. They will mentor Publication 2 students and provide guidance to Publication 1 students. Participation in this course will prepare students for future work in publishing, advertising, marketing, and journalism. Students must have successfully completed Publication 1 and Publication 2 to take this course. Students are eligible to take this course from Grade 10.

ELR 450 AP English Literature and Composition
The AP English Literature and Composition course focuses on the development of literature reading techniques and analytical, argumentative composition. AP English Literature and Composition is an introductory college-level literary analysis course. Students cultivate their understanding of literature through reading and analyzing texts as they explore concepts like character, setting, structure, perspective, figurative language, and literary analysis in the context of literary works. Students will also develop their composition techniques, challenging and exploring the conventions of academic writing. Students are eligible to take this course in Grade 12.

DT 100 Introduction to Design ThinkingIntroduction to Design Thinking introduces students who are new to IPA to the 5 step Stanford model design philosophy by way of design challenges and long-term projects. Fundamental topics in this course include introduction to the design thinking process, the use of qualitative and quantitative information, understanding the “How might we..” problem statement, exploring quantity over quality within ideation, fabricating both low and high fidelity prototypes, understanding the difference between open and closed testing environments, learning how to understand data as a way to refine one’s design, the importance of failure as a teacher, understanding the importance of repeat, and the nonlinear journey one takes through this process. This course will have an emphasis on product and service-based design (i.e. industrial design). We will be looking through the lens of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) to create well rounded solutions to everyday problems. Prior experience with the design thinking process is not required to take this course.

DT 115 Introduction to Digital Storytelling
In the Introduction to Digital Storytelling course, students will have the chance to tell their stories through a variety of multimedia such as blogs, podcasts, digital photography, and filmmaking. They will review and analyze a number of these media to see how different people use these media to get their message to their target audience. Students will learn and define basic but necessary terminology for these media, as well as concepts and skills that they will apply to create their own blogs, podcasts, and short films/videos. Students will then create a digital portfolio of their work and reflect on their processes, works, and their school year.

DT 125 Introduction to Marketing
Semester 1: Intro to Marketing – Students will learn how to target and reach prospective customers and communicate the benefits of their product design. Design thinking will be used in this curriculum intermittently as students work through the phases of empathize, define, ideate, prototype, and test in marketing. The art of rhetoric will be encapsulated as students begin to engage their chosen audience.A brief overview of the history of marketing from the past to present. Students will learn the basics of Social media marketing, Facebook ads, and other lead generating tools.

Semester 2: Financial Literacy – Students will learn the basics of financing and budgeting and how to implement these new found skills into the real world (life after high school).

DT 150 Introduction to VEX Robotics
In this introductory robotics course, students will learn the fundamentals of programming with VEXcode blocks. Students will apply these skills to code both a virtual (VEX VR) and physical (VEX EXP) robot. This course will introduce a variety of sensors (including bumper, distance, and vision sensors) and challenge students to discover the ways robots can use sensors to interact with their environment. Additionally, students will gain engineering skills as they work in groups to modify their robot’s design to more efficiently and effectively complete the desired tasks. Over the course of the school year, students will progress through increasingly difficult laboratory scenarios, culminating in a final showcase of their robot’s capabilities. With an emphasis on project-based learning, this course will utilize the design thinking process to guide students through a wide range of hands-on activities and projects.

DT 155 Introduction to Graphic Design
Graphic Design combines art and technology to visually communicate ideas or concepts. Students will be introduced to the principles and elements of design, color theory, and typography that are used for visual communication. Students will have a chance to create original designs, such as logos, flyers, posters, and stickers and will start a digital portfolio.

DT 160 Introduction to Game Development
In this course, students will use the design thinking process to explore game development, from conception and planning all the way to release on pc/mac, web, and mobile platforms. After analyzing the designs of classic games like Super Mario Bros, Tetris, Space Invaders, and Pokemon, students will learn to create their own games. The class will delve into key game development concepts, including graphics, animation, sound effects, music, collisions, particle effects, and physics. As a class, students will build a series of simple arcade-style games, culminating in the (highly original and not at all knock-off) platformer Super Navigator Siblings. Then, at the end of the school year, students will have the opportunity to design and create their own game idea. Students enrolling under the Advanced Game/Software Development designation will spend the year working in a directed study on a larger game/software project of their own design. Advanced students are expected to have prior experience creating games/software in C# with the Unity game engine via first taking the Introductory version of this course, taking a similar course elsewhere, or providing evidence of comparable skills through self-study.

DT 175 Introduction to Computer Science
This introductory computer science course is designed for students with no or limited previous experience in programming. After exploring general problem solving concepts, students will be introduced to the ways computers process information and how computers can be used to solve the pressing problems of our daily lives. Students will be challenged to utilize the design thinking process to propose their own app ideas before embarking on a digital expedition to develop the programming skills they need to make their ideas a reality. Students will first practice fundamental coding concepts in Python and then move on to utilizing those fundamentals as the building blocks to create real software. Projects may include students building their own apps, games, and websites. With an emphasis on project-based learning, this course will utilize the design thinking process to guide students through a wide range of hands-on activities and projects.

DT 185 Introduction to Engineering
Introduction to Engineering is a general survey of engineering topics. The course aims to familiarize students with the engineering profession, the different engineering disciplines, the design process for exploratory projects, the work in interdisciplinary teams, the ethics and professional behavior, the lifelong learning, the written and oral presentation of technical concepts, and problem solving. Students will encounter a variety of topics in engineering, including architecture, environmental engineering, civil engineering, urban planning, structural engineering and mechanical engineering. This introductory level course is intended for first time designers and others seeking introductory training in a wide range of basic engineering skills to learn about the engineering design process. The interdisciplinary nature of this engineering course makes science and mathematics more engaging, interesting, concrete, and relevant. This is primarily a hands-on, project based course.

DT 260 Advanced Game/ Software Development
In this course, students will use the design thinking process to explore game development, from conception and planning all the way to release on pc/mac, web, and mobile platforms. After analyzing the designs of classic games like Super Mario Bros, Tetris, Space Invaders, and Pokemon, students will learn to create their own games. The class will delve into key game development concepts, including graphics, animation, sound effects, music, collisions, particle effects, and physics. As a class, students will build a series of simple arcade-style games, culminating in the (highly original and not at all knock-off) platformer Super Navigator Siblings. Then, at the end of the school year, students will have the opportunity to design and create their own game idea. Students enrolling under the Advanced Game/Software Development designation will spend the year working in a directed study on a larger game/software project of their own design. Advanced students are expected to have prior experience creating games/software in C# with the Unity game engine via first taking the Introductory version of this course, taking a similar course elsewhere, or providing evidence of comparable skills through self-study.

DT 275 Advanced Computer Science
This course is designed for students with previous experience in computer science. It is recommended for any high school student who wants to continue their computer science education after completing an introductory course. Students will expand their programming skills by developing solutions in Python, one of the most popular and in-demand programming languages. In this advanced course, students will be challenged to expand their understanding of data structures and algorithms with the goal of solving a variety of computation-based problems. With a focus on student-led learning, this class will help each student develop a portfolio of programs (including apps, games, data visualization, and more) to showcase for college admissions, internships, and beyond.

DT 385 Advanced Engineering
The course is for designers who have just taken the introduction to engineering program and want to learn advanced engineering skills and concepts. This course delves deeper into architecture and civil engineering-based projects and various tools used by engineers. Students will build a portfolio of advanced projects throughout this course and will be expected to keep an engineering journal to document their processes as they utilize the engineering design cycle to develop their deeper understanding of engineering topics.

DT 450 Advanced VEX Robotics
In this self-directed course, students use coding and engineering to solve a series of robotics challenges in preparation for competition-level VEX. Students will learn more advanced computer coding, transitioning from blocks to text-based programming in Python. Additionally, this course will build upon the students’ knowledge of sensors and challenge students to utilize the design thinking process to engineer new robot builds and create algorithms to solve advanced robotics problems. The course will culminate in a final team project to design and develop a complex robot capable of completing a showcase of student-designed  challenges. This final project may involve 3D printing custom robot parts to create advanced robot builds.

DT _____ Advanced Engineering Independent Studies
This program allows students to explore an area of study in engineering that is not offered within the current curriculum to provide students with an enrichment opportunity that goes beyond standard curriculum experiences. The intent is for students to pursue advanced study that involves a dimension different from that offered in a regularly scheduled class. The course concludes with a multimedia presentation during which the student presents their culminating research/project and then fields questions from a panel that includes the department chair, faculty sponsor, administration, and any other invited guests. Interested students must develop a project proposal in conjunction with a faculty sponsor. This class is a pass/fail course. Students who have completed

DT 185 and DT 385
are eligible for this course. Students must also submit a proposal/ application form for approval into this course. This course cannot be used toward fulfilling graduation requirements, but will count toward total credits awarded.

DT _____ Independent Studies in Design Thinking
Students who have already completed the advanced course in Computer Science, Game Development, or Robotics have the option to enroll in an Independent Study in their area of expertise. To be accepted into Independent Study, students must first have a project proposal approved by the instructor. Project proposals must give a detailed overview of a project that showcases the student’s advanced abilities and will require the development of additional skills in the expertise area, justify the significance of the project and who the project will impact, and provide a tentative timeline for project completion.

DT 475 AP Computer Science Principles
AP Computer Science Principles is an introductory college-level computing course that introduces students to the breadth of the field of computer science. Students learn to design and evaluate solutions and to apply computer science to solve problems through the development of algorithms and programs. They incorporate abstraction into programs and use data to discover new knowledge. Students also explain how computing innovations and computing systems—including the internet work, explore their potential impacts, and contribute to a computing culture that is collaborative and ethical. Students will be placed in the class based on teacher recommendation and academic capabilities. Students will take the AP Exam for this course.

HSS 100 World History
The Grade 9 Humanities course focuses on a thematic examination of early human civilizations through modern world events/history. It begins with the early formation of human tribes/civilizations and continues through the 21st century, where globalization of nations forced new alliances and issues with economic fairness. Contemporary effects from colonization and imperialization will be interlinked to the concept of being global citizens. The focus will be on different time periods, as well as the formation of new national identities and governments. Issues of discrimination, community, and belonging will also be addressed through the close reading of various primary sources, periodicals, selected articles, and handouts. Students will be expected to understand and express, orally and in written format, how religion, economic systems, and culture play a key role in how countries interact. The class will be supplemented with a variety of relevant books, films, and current events. Key skills will include: research, analysis of information for bias, public speaking, how to form a persuasive argument both orally and in a written MLA format.

HSS 200 Hawaiian Studies/ Asian & Pacific Studies
Hawaiian Studies – Hawaiian Studies is a semester course that provides students with a broad overview of life in ancient Hawai‘i, Hawaiian values, and current issues that are significant to Hawai‘i’s people. Depending on student interest, topics of study may include, but are not limited to: cultural practices, physical environment, societal organization, hana no‘eau (arts and crafts), ‘ōlelo Hawai’i (Hawaiian language) and mele Hawai‘i (Hawaiian music).

Asia & Pacific Studies – Asian Pacific Studies is a semester course that gives students a broad overview of the influence and impact of Asian culture in Hawai‘i. Depending on student interest, topics of study may include, but are not limited to: immigration, genealogical research, cultural practices, local traditions, religion, and cuisine.

HSS 300 U.S. History
United States History is a year-long course during Grade 11 that provides students with an overview of the events from the Civil War through the present. Students will learn the functions of the United States Government and how the United States Constitution affects them as American citizens. Geography and current events will be integrated into our class on a regular basis. Students will have the opportunity to select topics of particular interest to them, and refine their research and questioning skills in order to learn more about their selected topics.

HSS 400 Psychology
Psychology is an introductory psychology course. Students cultivate their understanding of the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes through inquiry-based investigations as they explore concepts like the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Students are eligible to take this course in Grade 12.

HSS 450 AP Psychology
AP Psychology is an introductory college-level psychology course. Students cultivate their understanding of the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes through inquiry-based investigations as they explore concepts like the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Students are eligible to take this course in Grade 12.

HSS _____ Criminal Justice
Students will learn the Criminal Justice system; How the process works(doesn’t work), including the steps of the police, lawyers, courts, judges, prisons, etc. Additionally, students will be required to learn their rights per the US Constitution and how State and Federal laws are enacted to protect our individual rights. Case studies will be examined so that real life situations will be scrutinized so that there is real life learning. Guest speakers will include a variety of people from the system, including(but not limited to) Police Officers, Probation Officers, Lawyers, Judges, etc.

HSS _____ Global Leaders of the 21st Century
This course will prepare students for a more inclusive global world by giving them the experience to learn about current international issues that will help them to become more compassionate, tolerant, caring and understanding of the people around them. In combination with the Model United Nations; students will refine their critical thinking skills and will acquire debate skills and public speaking skills that will help them to contribute in providing solutions for international issues.

HSS ______ Japanese Immigration in Hawai’i
In this course, students will study Japanese immigrants in Hawaii, then each student will find a topic of interest regarding Japanese immigrants in Hawaii and deepen their knowledge through fieldwork, research, and interviews based on project-based learning.

MAT 100 Algebra 1
Algebra I is the first year in the college preparatory math sequence and lays the foundation for all future math courses. This class will challenge the students to reach their full potential in mathematics as they explore and develop a general understanding of algebra and its real-world applications. Students will investigate a variety of topics including equations, inequalities, functions and all of their representations. Students will work in collaboration with classmates to solve complex problems and present their work to the class. Students are expected to support all of their solutions with written work and explanations. The goal of this class is for students to leave the course with the ability to make connections between mathematical concepts and the world around them. They will also develop/strengthen their ability to take risks while solving complex problems in and out of the math class. This
course lays the foundation for mathematical literacy that will help students be successful in every subsequent course in mathematics.

MAT 200 Geometry
Geometry is designed to help students understand the history of, properties of, and relationships between space, points, distance, shape, size, and relative position of figures. Geometry, an ancient form of mathematics, is a Greek word that refers to the measurement of the Earth. The curriculum will include the basics of geometry, the nature of logic and proof, parallel and perpendicular lines, similar and congruent triangles, right triangles and trigonometry, quadrilaterals, transformations, circles, and volume and surface area. Students will progress through this cumulative material to master the skills and concepts needed to understand geometry.

MAT 250 Algebra 2
Algebra 2 is designed to help strengthen the students’ understanding and application of Geometry, Advanced Algebra Topics and Trigonometry. The course is organized to encourage students to become aware of the links between mathematics and other subjects; to emphasize different methods of communicating solutions (algebraically, graphically, verbally, etc.) and to allow students to explore their own ideas mathematically.

MAT 350 Precalculus
Precalculus is designed to prepare students for AP Calculus AB in Grade 12. It is a continuation of their previous high school math studies and weaves together more advanced topics in Algebra and Geometry. Most of the course will focus on an in-depth study of functions (including exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions) and their applications before moving on to sequences and series, probability and ending the year with a study of conic sections. Students will be placed in this class based on teacher recommendation and academic capabilities.

MAT 300 Probability & Statistics
Probability deals with predicting the likelihood of future events. Statistics involves the analysis of the frequency of past events. This course will teach students about data collection over a broad spectrum of interdisciplinary topics and how to analyze, interpret, and share the data in a meaningful way. Prerequisite is successful completion of Algebra 1 with a grade of C or higher.

MAT 450 AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus AB is approximately equivalent to a semester-long university course focused on topics in differential and integral calculus. Students should have a secure foundational knowledge in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and functions before taking the course. Main topics will include limits, derivatives, integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The focus will be on mathematical reasoning, connecting concepts, implementing algebraic processes, connecting multiple representations, building notational fluency, and mathematical communication. Students are eligible to take this course in Grade 12. Students will be placed in this class based on teacher recommendation and academic capabilities.

NS 100 Environmental Science
This Grade 9 course will have students explore specific real-world environmental issues and gain an awareness of the science behind these issues. Students will explore the impact of our growing human population and understand that they have a stake in the future of the environment. By the end of this course students will be equipped with scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand interrelationships in the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternatives for resolving and/or preventing them, including environmental policies. Through these experiences, students will be recording data, gathering evidence, and presenting it to their peers verbally and in writing in different formats both digitally and in various physical formats.

NS 200 Biology
This Grade 10 course is intended to develop student’s understanding and appreciation of the biological world around them. The course will introduce life at the cellular level to include organelles, cellular processes, and genetics. In labs, students will investigate how enzymes work, how to use a microscope to visualize cells, as well as understand the properties of water. The course culminates with students exploring several of the human body systems. They will do this using science practices and skills, such as, creating models, creating and conducting investigations, formulating mathematical representations, as well as, applying concepts of statistics and probability. There will also be a continued emphasis on the scientific writing process.

NS 250 AP Biology
AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes, energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions. The AP Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course for biology majors. Prerequisites: Students should have successfully completed Biology and enrolled in Chemistry. Students will be placed in this class based on teacher recommendation and academic capabilities. Students are eligible to take this course starting from Grade 11.

NS 300 Chemistry
This course deals with the fundamental nature and reactions of matter. Chemistry also deals with the study of the changes of matter and the mechanisms by which changes occur. It is a core science that forms the basis of our understanding of both biological systems and our physical world. In this course students will study a wide range of topics to develop an understanding of atomic structure and use this knowledge to predict and explain properties of matter. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspect to this course – laboratories – that will allow students to develop a range of experimental skills, and an appreciation of the scientific method. Students are required to take this course in Grade 11.

NS 315 Anatomy & Physiology
This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization; homeostasis; cytology; histology; and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous systems and special senses. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. Laboratory work includes dissection of preserved specimens, microscopic study, physiologic experiments, computer simulations, and multimedia presentations. Students will be eligible to take this course in Grade 11 or 12 as an elective science or science alternative.

NS 350 AP Chemistry
AP Chemistry provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore content such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium. AP Chemistry is an elective designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. Prerequisites: Students should have successfully completed Chemistry, Algebra 2, and Biology. Students are eligible to take this course in Grade 12.

NS 400 Physics 1
This Grade 11 and 12 course is the study of the way the universe works. In this course, students will discover how Newtonian and classical physics can describe and explain the physical world. The topics covered will include motion, forces, gravity, energy, momentum, fluids, heat/thermodynamics, waves, sound, light, optics, electricity, and magnetism. Additional topics such as nuclear physics and modern physics may also be introduced if time allows. Students will explore the latest discoveries in physics and through scientific inquiry and experimentation, students will engage in a study of real-world ideas and concepts requiring both conceptual and procedural understanding. This is a conceptually based curriculum that utilizes basic arithmetic and algebraic skills. In this course, students will further develop their use of mathematics, which is the language of physics. This class is recommended for students who are developing their algebra skills.

NS 410 Physics 2
This Grade 11 and 12 course is the more mathematically rigorous version of Physics 1 in the study of the way the universe works. In this course, students will discover how Newtonian and classical physics can describe and explain the physical world. The topics covered will include motion, forces, gravity, energy, momentum, fluids, heat/thermodynamics, waves, sound, light, optics, electricity, and magnetism. Additional topics such as nuclear physics and modern physics may also be introduced if time allows. Students will explore the latest discoveries in physics and through scientific inquiry and experimentation, students will engage in a study of real-world ideas and concepts requiring both conceptual and procedural understanding. This course utilizes a variety of mathematics skills, such as data analysis, measurement, scientific notation, trigonometric functions, and advanced algebraic expressions. In this course, students will further develop their use of mathematics, which is the language of physics. This course is recommended for students who have completed or are concurrently enrolled in Pre-calculus.

NS 450 AP Physics 1
AP Physics is the more rigorous physics class, designed for the student who is going on to a technical or scientific education in college or university. It leads to the Advanced Placement examination, which is accepted by many universities as credit for their introductory Physics course. AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore these topics: kinematics, forces and dynamics, oscillations, fluids, work, energy, power, momentum, torque and rotational motion. AP Physics 1 is a full-year course that is the equivalent of a first-semester introductory college course in algebra-based physics. Students should have completed Geometry and Algebra 2, and concurrently enrolled in Calculus. It is preferred that students have completed either Physics 1 or 2 before enrolling in AP. Students will be placed in this class based on teacher recommendation and academic capabilities. Students are eligible to take this course in Grade 12. For 11th graders interested in taking this, Teacher, Head of Science, Vice Principal and Principal permission is required.

PE 100 Physical and Health Education – High School
High School Physical and Health Education will allow students to continue their growth within the group while also establishing themselves as leaders in different areas. Students will work on the skills and understanding necessary to participate successfully in a variety of physical activities. The focus of team and individual sports will change from participation and execution to more of a mindset of learning, practicing, refining, adapting, and reacting to change. Students will use critical thinking to solve different situations and create new games sports. Meal and exercise plans will continue to take shape. Students will use self-motivational skills and personal responsibility. Strength training, cardio, and “nontraditional” fitness will be introduced. Reflections, written tests, oral and visual assessments will be some of the ways that students are graded on their accomplishments. Overall, students will deepen their interest in and enjoyment of all aspects of physical activities and overall health.

VPA 100 Visual Arts 1
VPA 200 Visual Arts 2
These introductory courses focus on the development of student creativity, craftsmanship and artistic vocabulary through the study, creation, and discussion of two-dimensional and three-dimensional artwork. Students have the opportunity to further explore their artistic self-expression by exploring a wide range of art making (including, but not limited to: drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, collage, etc.). Students review technical skills, but mostly focus on using the elements of art and principles of design to create art that explores new ideas and utilizes experimental art-making. The courses are less concerned about the final product, rather, it focuses on the experimental, trial and error process and allows students the freedom to try new styles, techniques and propose new ideas. It’s not about the destination, but the journey!

VPA _____ Introduction to Visual Arts
An introductory college-level visual arts course covering elements of art, principles of design, and the creative process. Major historical movements in art are covered as well as student expressions in various visual media and forms. Lectures and studio demonstrations.

VPA 300 Visual Arts 3
VPA 400 Visual Arts 4
Visual Arts 3 and Visual Arts 4 are advanced courses. Previous visual art experience is recommended. These courses are designed to provide students with a lifelong appreciation for the arts, as well as provide a solid foundation for students who pursue post-secondary studies in the arts. These courses have specific criteria set for both Studio Work and sketchbook which are clearly defined. The courses stress practice in the use of various media, the acquisition of techniques, the mature development of creative ideas and the ability to relate to all forms of art in their many social and historical contexts. The Visual Arts 3 and 4 curriculum is concurrent with the Visual Arts 3 Honors course but with less extensive writing requirements.

VPA 305 Visual Arts 3 (Honors)
VPA 405 Visual Arts 4 (Honors)
These are rigorous, advanced courses for students who take a particular interest in the Visual Arts. The courses are designed to provide students with a lifelong appreciation for the arts, as well as provide excellent preparation for students who pursue post-secondary studies in the arts. This course has specific criteria set for both Studio Work and sketchbook which are clearly defined and quite demanding. The courses stress practice in the use of various media, the acquisition of techniques, the mature development of creative ideas and the ability to relate to all forms of art in their many social and historical contexts.

VPA 335 Visual Arts Open Studio 1
VPA 435 Visual Arts Open Studio 2
These courses are for students who would like to have a venue for creative expression and want to challenge themselves in an artistic way. They are designed to provide students with a lifelong appreciation for the arts, as well as provide the time and instruction for the student to explore different types of art-making. Along with studio work, the students also maintain a sketchbook with weekly drawing prompts. The classes emphasize practice in the use of various media, the acquisition of techniques and the mature development of ideas. A student does not need any previous experience with art to take this class.

VPA 101 Jewelry & Metalsmithing 1
This introductory course explores both the technical and conceptual aspects of modern metalsmithing and jewelry making. Students will learn a number of basic jewelry making techniques including sawing, filing, torch soldering, scoring, linkages, hollow construction, wire construction and more. In addition, discussions will be held on contemporary, historical, and conceptual jewelry making traditions. Concept building and design drafting in a sketchbook will be introduced by the instructor and expected of each student. Keeping an active sketchbook is an integral part of the course. Students will have the opportunity to design and complete guided and self-directed projects which allow them to creatively demonstrate the skills and techniques acquired throughout the course.

VPA 201 Jewelry & Metalsmithing 2
This advanced course explores both the technical and conceptual aspects of modern metalsmithing and jewelry making. Students will further their knowledge in the hand fabrication techniques they already covered in Jewelry & Metalsmithing 1. Students will learn a number of advanced techniques such as chasing, basket setting, bezel setting, cage setting, granulation, metal inlay, wire forging, wire construction, ring series: rings of Hawaii research project, non-metal materials of Hawaii: shells, feathers, flowers, and wood! Jewelry making techniques will include sawing, filing, torch soldering, scoring, linkages, hollow construction, wire construction, chasing, and more. In addition, discussions will be held on contemporary, historical, and conceptual jewelry making traditions. Previous enrollment and successful completion of Jewelry & Metalsmithing 1 is a prerequisite to applying to Jewelry & Metalsmithing 2.

For students who have previously done bench jewelry work outside of IPA and wish to apply to this course, a bench test will be administered to ensure the student is best prepared for the level of this course.

VPA _____ Forging & Enameling
In Forging + Enameling students will gain a basic understanding of the forging process by turning copper rod stock into functioning utensils. Students will also gain an understanding of the bench jewelry basics and create pieces of enameled adornment inspired by the works of René Lalique that were created during the Art Nouveau decorative art era. Each student will engage with the design thinking process and keep an active sketchbook as an integral part of their personal practice. Active utilization of the design cycle alongside the arts builds a solid STEAM foundation that is essential for 21st century citizenry.

VPA 110 Ceramics 1
VPA 210 Ceramics 2
VPA 310 Ceramics 3
VPA 410 Ceramics 4
These courses focus on the development of the student’s creativity, craftsmanship and artistic vocabulary through the study, creation, and discussion of two-dimensional and three- dimensional artwork. Students have the opportunity to further explore their artistic self-expression by exploring a range of art, including drawing, painting, and collage. This class emphasizes ceramics, which includes construction styles and methods, figurative sculpture- animal and human sculpture, wall sculpture with installation, mix media and large kiln firing. Students use artistic perception in processing, analysis and responding to all sensory information through the language and skills unique to ceramics.

VPA 325 Ceramics Open Studio 1
VPA 425 Ceramics Open Studio 2
Ceramics Open Studio courses explore the role of ceramic art as an expression of culture throughout history. The study of ceramic art provides students with opportunities to develop and nourish higher level thinking. Skills associated with artistic thinking include the ability to see clearly, analyze, reflect, problem solve, forge to make connections as well as information and generate new ideas from diverse sources. Various hand building techniques and forms will be used to create projects in which students use clay as the artistic medium. Hands-on ceramic art and pottery making with local guest artist workshops will include discussions on various aspects and inquiries pertaining to careers in fine arts. Visiting artists will engage with students through studio visits and critiques. Students will build a portfolio of their work as part of the course curriculum.

VPA 155 Theatre Arts 1
VPA 255 Theatre Arts 2
Theatre Arts 1 and 2 are introductory courses designed to give students opportunities to discover the artist we each hold within. Students are trained in the fundamental skills of theatre arts, including technical theatre, public speaking, improvisation techniques, creative drama, body control, voice, diction, pantomime, learning of lines, creation of character, projection of ideas and emotions and acting of scenes from plays. It includes dramatic play, story enactment, imagination journeys, theatre games, puppeteering, storytelling, role playing, fencing, hand to hand stage combat, and technical theatre. No prerequisite required upon teacher approval.

VPA 355 Theatre Arts 3
VPA 455 Theatre Arts 4
Theatre is a dynamic, collaborative, and live art form. It is a practical subject that encourages discovery through experimentation, the taking of risks, and the presentation of ideas to others. It results in the development of both theatre and life skills; the building of confidence, creativity and working collaboratively. These multifaceted advanced courses give students the opportunity to make theatre as creators, designers, directors, and performers. They emphasize the importance of working both individually and collaboratively as part of an ensemble. These courses offer the opportunity to engage actively in the creative process, transforming ideas into action as inquisitive and productive artists. Students experience the course from contrasting artistic perspectives. They learn to apply research and theory to inform and to contextualize their work. Students learn to appreciate that through the processes of researching, creating, preparing, presenting, and critically reflecting on theatre—as participants and audience members—they gain a richer understanding of themselves, their community, and the world. No prerequisite required upon teacher approval.

VPA 365 Theatre Arts 3 (Honors)
VPA 465 Theatre Arts 4 (Honors)
Theatre Arts 3 Honors and 4 Honors are courses designed to allow students to engage in more intensive preparation of their craft. These courses run in conjunction with Theatre Arts 3 and 4 and therefore, the students will participate in the same projects as students enrolled in the standard course, but the writing and presentation components are much more extensive. Theatre is a dynamic, collaborative, and live art form. It is a practical subject that encourages discovery through experimentation, risk-taking, and the presentation of ideas to others. It results in the development of both theatre and life skills; the building of confidence, creativity and working collaboratively. These multifaceted, advanced courses give students the opportunity to make theatre as creators, designers, directors, and performers. They emphasize the importance of working both individually and collaboratively as part of an ensemble. They offer the opportunity to engage actively in the creative process, transforming ideas into action as inquisitive and productive artists. Students experience the courses from contrasting artistic perspectives. No prerequisite required upon teacher approval.

VPA _____ Fashion Topics
This course is an opportunity for students from 9-12 grade to learn about what is going on in the ever-changing world of fashion. The curriculum will include topics like: The history of a current trend, the history of fashion, and exploration of fashion design and the importance of being an individual. Projects might include designing sneakers, a backpack, or a hat and designing and making a t-shirt. Students will also touch up on methods and processes of textile design and clothing lessons. Fashion Topics exposes the students to many of the great aspects of fashion. It serves as a great source of inspiration for many career paths to be explored in their future.

VPA 125 Beginning Instrumental Ensemble
This course is designed for students who have little to no prior musical experience at the high school level. Students are assigned instruments based on their prior ability (if any) and interest. Students may be required to rent their own instrument depending upon instrument availability. Along with weekly rehearsals and a culminating performance, the students continue their music education by focusing on Music Theory, History, Expression/Timbre, Composition, and Performance. Students who excel or are awarded leadership roles in Beginning Instrumental Ensemble will have the opportunity to take Advanced Band or Advanced Orchestra the following year.

VPA 425 Advanced Band
Advanced Band participants must have a minimum of one year experience in Beginning Instrumental Ensemble (or, prior experience with an instrument) to participate and must have the instructor’s approval before registering for this course. Along with weekly rehearsals and a culminating performance, the students continue their music education by focusing on Music Theory, History, Ethnomusicology, Expression/Timbre, Composition, and Performance. Students demonstrate their growth in musical technique and skill through performances in the IPA music concerts and events throughout the school year. No prerequisite required upon teacher approval. Students will perform in the IPA music concerts.

VPA 426 Advanced Orchestra
Advanced Orchestra participants must have a minimum of one year of experience in Beginning Instrumental Ensemble (or prior experience with an instrument) to participate and must have the instructor’s approval before registering for this course. Along with weekly rehearsals and a culminating performance, the students will continue their music education by focusing on Music Theory, History, Ethnomusicology, Expression/Timbre, Composition, and Performance. Students will perform in the IPA music concerts. No prerequisite required upon teacher approval.

VPA _____ Songmaking
Songmaking is an innovative high school class designed to immerse students in the art and craft of creating music. The course is thoughtfully structured across four quarters, beginning with Song Analysis, where students delve into the rich history and key elements of songs, gaining a comprehensive understanding of various musical genres. In the Creation quarter, students are encouraged to generate and explore their own ideas, fostering creativity and self-expression. The Refinement phase refines these ideas, teaching students to craft compelling and polished pieces through revision. Finally, the Making quarter brings it all together as students put their compositions to music, creating a collaborative album showcasing their unique talents and artistic growth. Songmaking not only hones musical skills but also instills a deep appreciation for the artistry behind the songs we love.

WL 101a Spanish 1
This course is for students with little to no prior experience with the Spanish language at the high school level. Students are exposed to the Hispanic Culture and will learn basic vocabulary and grammar to communicate with peers and teachers. This course emphasizes a holistic approach to language study, which promotes a clear understanding that all knowledge is interrelated.

WL 201a Spanish 2
This course enhances the skills learned in the Level 1 course. Students review grammar in a more comprehensive manner. Students are also introduced to new advanced grammar concepts and verb tenses. There is an emphasis on more complex reading selections that may include contemporary and/or traditional literature. Writing becomes more formal and includes essay writing. Students develop a greater understanding for the culture of the target language through the knowledge of the geography and history of the culture.

WL 301a Spanish 3
Students continue to develop their proficiency in speaking, listening, writing and reading by interacting with other speakers of Spanish. Students will understand oral and written messages in the target language and will make level appropriate oral and written presentations. Students communicate on a variety of topics using complex structures, moving from concrete to more abstract concepts. They will comprehend the main ideas of authentic materials that they read and hear and are able to identify significant details when topics are familiar.

WL 401a Spanish 4
Students are able to engage in conversation and comprehend another person’s dialogue without much repetition. Topics go well beyond basic needs and include: personal and family affairs, current events, school, work, etc. Students can comprehend descriptions and narration referring to past, present, or future events. They can comprehend dialogue about special fields of interest and narratives of a non-technical or specialized nature. When listening to material restricted mainly to vocabulary and structures studied in class, their comprehension appears to be on a near native-like level. There is an increased comprehension of in-depth material about special interest topics used in class. Grammar control includes all but the infrequently used and the most complex forms and word order problems. Students work toward building a larger reading, speaking, and listening vocabulary through use of materials representative of the Spanish speaking culture.

WL 501a AP Spanish Language & Culture
The AP Spanish Language & Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational skills in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP Spanish Language & Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in Spanish. The AP Spanish Language & Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions). Students will be placed in this class based on teacher recommendation and academic capabilities.

WL 101b Japanese 1
This course is for students with little to no prior experience with the Japanese language at the high school level. This course is designed to introduce the basics of the Japanese language and understanding of Japanese culture. Students will develop multi-literacy skills through the use of a range of learning tools, such as multimedia, in the various modes of communication. Students are introduced to the integration of language and cultural knowledge to communicate their personal perspectives on topics such as self-introduction, daily life, celebration, getting around etc. Students are expected to apply their knowledge to unfamiliar situations. The course also fosters curiosity, inquiry and a lifelong interest and enjoyment in language learning. By the end of this course, students aim to become an emergent communicator in Japanese. Students also learn Japanese writing systems (Hiragana and Katakana).

WL 201b Japanese 2
This course is a continuation of Japanese Level 1. It enhances the basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing acquired in Level 1. Our goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to use them in a linguistically and culturally appropriate way. By the end of the year, students will be able to communicate on daily life topics. Students will also learn approximately 90 Kanji characters in this course. Students are expected to apply their prior knowledge to unfamiliar situations. The course also fosters curiosity, inquiry, and a lifelong interest and enjoyment in language learning.

WL 301b Japanese 3
This course is a continuation of Japanese Level 2. Students will expand their Japanese grammar and vocabulary. In addition, students will learn to distinguish between the formal/polite and informal/conversational ways to tackle different topics and authority levels when addressing Japanese speakers . By the end of the course, students will be able to recognize and write approximately 120 kanji characters. They will communicate in Japanese within a variety of contexts, such as ordering food in Japanese, as well as eating, cooking, and discussing the similarities and differences between American and Japanese cultures.

WL 401b Japanese 4
This course is designed for students who completed Level 3 successfully. Students will explore social, historical, and cultural knowledge that influence the ways of the Japanese. Students will study a wide-range of topics such as, keigo (honorifics), and the traditional cultural arts including the tea ceremony, calligraphy, and Japanese haiku poetry. By the end of this course, students will be able to write 400 kanji and communicate at a more sophisticated, intermediate level in Japanese.

WL 501b AP Japanese Language & Culture
This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Japanese Language & Culture exam based on the Japanese National Standards and the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. It also supports the learning of all advanced students of Japanese seeking to improve their proficiency. The course aims to prepare students for success in daily interactions at an advanced level and in a culturally appropriate manner. Students will be able to further their communicative skills in listening, reading, writing, and speaking, as well as enhance their cultural expertise. These topics will prepare students to develop their perception of Japanese social issues and cultural values while also expanding their understanding of the language. Through various activities in and out of the classroom, students will acquire a robust knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, and kanji characters. Students will be placed in this class based on teacher recommendation and academic capabilities. Students will take the AP Exam for this course.

WL 502b Japanese 5 – Business & Culture
This course is intended for 12th-grade students and is designed to explore a wide range of topics, from Japanese culture and beliefs to negotiation and business practices. Students will study three types of honorifics in Japanese (keigo), categorized into three groups: polite language (teineigo), respectful language (sonkeigo), and humble language (kenjōgo). They will refine their intercultural competence by accessing business, political, historical, and cultural information from a variety of sources. Through practicum experience and hands-on activities, they will acquire robust communication skills and a deeper understanding of cultural values in Japanese society.

WL 101c ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi 1
This ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi course is a basic level course that focuses on building a strong foundation in language skills. Students will develop their proficiency in the language through engaging activities and opportunities. There will be an emphasis on building vocabulary and learning the basic sentence structures. The ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi program is geared at developing competency in the target language but also to connect to the culture and history of Hawaiʻi and its significance in historical and modern Hawaiʻi. If applicable, students are able to participate in learning trips, learn from guest speakers, or engage in workshops led by cultural practitioners. The students who complete this course will be able to continue on to ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi Level 2.

WL 201c ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi 2
This course is designed to build on the foundation of Level 1 and understanding of Hawaiian culture. Students are expected to apply their previously acquired language structures and vocabulary to new and unfamiliar situations. Linguistic and cultural knowledge will be further developed in this course. ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi Level 2 also fosters curiosity, inquiry, and a lifelong interest and enjoyment in Hawaiian language learning. The ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi program is geared at developing competency in the target language but also to connect to the culture and history of Hawaiʻi and its significance in historical and modern Hawaiʻi. If applicable, students are able to participate in learning trips, learn from guest speakers, or engage in workshops led by cultural practitioners. The students who complete this course will be able to continue on to ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi Level 3.

WL 301c ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi 3
In ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi 3, students will refine their language skills learned in previous levels. At this level, students will apply more of what they are learning in organic situations such as conversations and impromptu speeches. Students in this course will learn more advanced grammatical structures and vocabulary which support understanding of different texts. The ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi program is geared at developing competency in the target language but also to connect to the culture and history of Hawaiʻi and its significance in historical and modern Hawaiʻi. If applicable, students are able to participate in learning trips, learn from guest speakers, or engage in workshops led by cultural practitioners. The students who complete this course will be able to continue on to ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi Level 4 or HAWN 1100/ HAWN 1200.

WL 401c ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi 4
In ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi 4, students will learn more complex sentence structures to develop their language skills in both oral and written forms. Conversational Hawaiian, moʻolelo, and mele will be a large focus to support the understanding of the nuances and multiple meanings of vocabulary and phrases. By the end of the course, the students will be able to effectively choose from a variety of sentence structures to best convey their ideas. The ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi program is geared at developing competency in the target language but also to connect to the culture and history of Hawaiʻi and its significance in historical and modern Hawaiʻi. If applicable, students are able to participate in learning trips, learn from guest speakers, or engage in workshops led by cultural practitioners. The students who complete this course will be able to continue on to ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi Level 5 or HAWN 1100/ HAWN 1200.

WL 501c ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi 5
ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi 5 will predominantly be conducted in Hawaiian. This course strongly emphasizes the importance of expressing ideas through conversation and written forms. At this level, students will show mastery in using a variety of sentence structures in conversations and in writing. They will be able to effectively analyze complex texts and audio recordings. Students will be able to understand and explain the layers of meaning of a word or phrase. The ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi program is geared at developing competency in the target language but also to connect to the culture and history of Hawaiʻi and its significance in historical and modern Hawaiʻi. If applicable, students are able to participate in learning trips, learn from guest speakers, or engage in workshops led by cultural practitioners.

HAWN 1100 & HAWN 1200
HAWN 1100 and HAWN 1200 are beginning level college courses. These are dual credit courses offered through Island Pacific Academy and Hawaiʻi Pacific University. These courses are offered to students who are continuing their ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi education. Students will enroll in two semester long courses. Upon successful completion of this course, students will receive 8 total course credits on their official college transcript. Students will build on and expand their learning of basic Hawaiian language skills with a focus on developing and sustaining more oral competency and aural competencies. Through projects, learning trips, and guest speakers, the students enrolled in this course will connect more with Hawaiian cultural concepts as well. These courses will adhere to the IPA and HPU standards for course participation and grading. For grade 12 students who are of satisfactory academic standing in these courses, they are eligible to prepare and wear a kīhei during their graduation ceremony. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi 3 through Island Pacific Academy. Required text for this course is Ka Lei Haʻaheo.

HAWN 2100 & HAWN 2200
HAWN 2100 and HAWN 2200 are the continuation courses of the HAWN 1100 and HAWN 1200 courses. These are dual credit courses offered through Island Pacific Academy and Hawaiʻi Pacific University. These courses are offered to students who are continuing their ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi education. Students will enroll in two semester long courses. Upon successful completion of this course, students will receive 8 total course credits on their official college transcript. Students at this level will expand their foundational knowledge of Hawaiian language with a focus of improving oral and aural fluency. The students at this level will participate in projects, learning trips, and learn from guest speakers to support their learning of Hawaiian cultural concepts as well. These courses will adhere to the IPA and HPU standards for course participation and grading. For grade 12 students who are of satisfactory academic standing in these courses, they are eligible to prepare and wear a kīhei during their graduation ceremony. Prerequisite: Successful completion of HAWN 1100 and HAWN 1200 dual credit courses through Island Pacific Academy and Hawaiʻi Pacific University. Required text for this course is Ka Lei Haʻaheo.